Anne Vere’s Poetry: Epitaphs on the death of her infant son in PANDORA, 1584 (Epitaph 4)

Anne Cecil de Vere, Countess OxfordFig. 1 

Ellen Moody’s webpage offers a wonderful presentation of Anne Cecil de Vere’s elegiac poems published in the 1584 volume of Pandora, a work composed by the poet John Soowthern (Sowthern, Southern, Soothern . . . ) and dedicated to Edward de Vere.  In this volume are poems Moody suggests were written by Anne Vere, although substantially modified by Soowthern.  My emphasis, however, is in whether or not codes (encryptions) support Anne de Vere as the author of four of the epitaphs, and to what extent might have Edward de Vere had something to do with their writing, as well as whether or not he might have approved of their publication as evidenced by his consistent letter-string ‘signature’ in both the frontispiece to Pandora and within the individual plaintexts as well.  Anne does refer (possibly) to being controlled in Sonnet 66, a reference, perhaps, to her husband.  Moody states there was a taboo  against the publication of the work of women, thus explaining why the attribution of the seven poems Moody attributes to Anne Vere are not signed by her.  In short, if there are codes and clusters in any of the poems, do they contain factual matter specific to the death of her infant son in 1583, and to what extent does she blame, to some extent, both Elizabeth I and Edward?

   Let’s begin with the 1584 frontispiece to Soowthern’s work, Pandora, A Musyque of the beautie of his Mistresse Diana: Pandora, frps., 1584 ded. to Oxford, poetry of Anne Vere Fig. 2 PANDORA, 1584, ded. to Oxford, frps.Fig. 3

Anne Cecil de Vere, Epytaphe 4:

Anger (rage) and blame:   Anne Vere, Epitaph 4, BETH constraintFig. 4 Anne Vere, Epitaph 4, VERE, QUEEN causedFig. 5:     “ECCE”  =  “BEHOLD Anne Vere, Epitaph 4, VERE, Queene causedFig. 6 Remarkably consistent letter-strings.

Click HERE to go to Epitaph 3

 

 

IV. III. MMXIV         

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